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Richard S. Kahler, MS, CFP®, ChFC®, CCIM

Richard S. Kahler, MS, CFP®, ChFC®, CCIM

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Information

Other Names: Rick Kahler
Firm:
Kahler Financial Group, Inc.
President and Chief Compliance Officer
Type: RIA
Description

Richard S. Kahler, MS, CFP®, CCIM is a representative at Kahler Financial Group, Inc. in Rapid City, SD. Kahler Financial Group, Inc. works with clients across the United States, primarily managing accounts for high net worth individuals, individuals, and pension and profit sharing plans and has more than $141M in assets ...(see more)

Advisor Timeline

No timeline events available.
Experience
EmployerYearsDates
Kahler Financial Group, Inc. 11 years, 7 months Jan 2003 - Present
Kahler Inc. 39 years, 3 months May 1975 - Aug 2014
Exams
ExamSeriesPassed Date
Uniform Securities Agent State Law ExaminationSeries 63 12/06/1982

Answers and Guides

Level 20 Level 20 Contributor 2 Answers and 48 Financial Guides

Top Answers

Answered Mar 01, 2012 near Rapid City, SD
4 votes
Absolutely. While your advisor may have signed a non-compete agreement with his firm, making it a violation for him to solicit you in any manner, nothing prohibits you from voluntarily following him.
Answered Mar 19, 2012 near Rapid City, SD
3 votes
The tried and true percentage is 25%, however, most lenders will expand that to 35%. With my 30 years in real estate I personally recommend a person keep their home payment as low as possible, around 25%. The amount you save in a lower payment is better ...(more)

Top Guides

Pitfalls and Possibilities of a Self-Directed IRA

Published Apr 09, 2012
18 votes
Most people with Individual Retirement Accounts open them with a bank or brokerage firm (the custodian) that limits what investments can go into the account. These custodians typically limit your investments to stocks, bonds, and ...(more)

Possibiities and Pitfalls of Reverse Mortgages

Published Mar 05, 2012
2 votes
Like most financial planners, I recommend not thinking of your home as a part of your investment portfolio or a source of retirement income. One possible exception to this rule is a reverse mortgage. Lenders ...(more)

Dire Emails About New Medicare Surtax Have It Wrong

Published Apr 02, 2012
2 votes
Ronald Reagan was noted for saying, “Trust but verify.” And that was before Al Gore invented the Internet. When it comes to believing forwarded emails with dire warnings, it’s a good idea to go even ...(more)
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*Answers and guides are provided without compensation.

Advisor Information

Articles/Publications

Combining Financial Planning With Psychology for Less Money Anxiety

Too often our emotions can get in the way of our financial decisions. Although someone may have worked to create the perfect financial plan, if none of the recommendations are implemented, the time and effort were ill-spent. Matt Greco recently wrote an article for the Financial Advisor Magazine discussing the Financial Therapy Association (FTA), a new association working to publish empirical research backing what most holistic planners have known for years: many of us can benefit from understanding the emotional aspect of how we make money decisions. Contrary to economic therory, very few people make rational money decisions in their best interest. That extends to people who have money!

More Colleges Adding Financial Planning Programs

Does that new employee in your financial planner’s office look too young to know anything about financial planning except how to apply for college loans? Don’t worry, he or she might have more education in financial planning than you think. According to an article by Jason Kephart published April 29 in Investment News, increasing numbers of colleges are offering majors in financial planning. This is good news for planning firms and their clients, according to several planners, including Rick, who were interviewed for the article.

Too Many Watchdogs?

Mutual funds that use futures contracts to invest in commodities are regulated, like other mutual funds, by the Securities and Exchange Commission. A recent rule change will require them to be registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission as well. A recent Investment News article cited several advisors and fund managers, including Rick, who doubt whether the double registration will do anything for investors except increase their costs. Rick said, “If anything, we need the right regulation, rather than trying to force two different regulators to mesh.”

How the Financially Disorganized Can Budget and Save

“Even the checkbook-challenged, filing system-deficient and perpetually messy can take steps to shore up their finances without undergoing a major personality overhaul.” In a January 18 article at CNBC.com titled “How the Financially Disorganized Can Budget and Save,” financial writer Dinah Wisenberg Brin has some suggestions for keeping track of your spending without a detailed budget. She cites Rick’s suggested strategy to “remove everything of importance — taxes, insurance, car and house payments, vacation and emergency savings, retirement funds — from the paycheck before it hits the bank.”

Comparison Shop to Avoid Money Wasters

“Something you keep on buying that just isn’t worth your hard-earned dollars.” That’s Kristin Colella’s definition of a “money-waster” in her article published March 23 in the online magazine MainStreet. Colella cited Rick’s recommendation: “Some of the best money a consumer can spend is for a subscription to Consumer Reports.” Read the rest of the article, How to Spot a Money Waster.

SmartMoney: Try South Dakota For Affordable Retirement

“South Dakota, with its chilly winters and long stretches of desolate land, may be pretty far down on your list of places to retire. But with the average married boomer facing a retirement savings shortfall of $30,000, advisers say the Mount Rushmore State is worth a look, given its low prices on everything from real estate to food.” That was the opening paragraph of a January 12 article by Catey Hill at SmartMoney.com. The magazine is currently running a series, “Retire Here, Not There,” featuring affordable retirement alternatives in various states. This week’s article featured South Dakota and recommended four retirement destinations: Rapid City, Sioux Falls, Pierre, and Hill City. Rick was among the sources interviewed for the article, which you can read here.

Easy Budgeting for the Organizationally Challenged

“Even the checkbook-challenged, filing system-deficient and perpetually messy can take steps to shore up their finances without undergoing a major personality overhaul.” In a January 18 article at CNBC.com titled “How the Financially Disorganized Can Budget and Save,” financial writer Dinah Wisenberg Brin has some suggestions for keeping track of your spending without a detailed budget. She cites Rick’s suggested strategy to “remove everything of importance — taxes, insurance, car and house payments, vacation and emergency savings, retirement funds — from the paycheck before it hits the bank.”

The Annual Financial Check-up

our doctor isn’t the only professional you should see for an annual checkup. You need to be visiting with your financial planner, too. Tara Siegel Bernard, a reporter with The New York Times, recently spoke with financial planners, including South Dakota financial planner Rick Kahler, about what you need to look at annually to be sure you keep your financial health in tip-top shape. Rick suggests a person needs to ask, “What has changed in your life in the last year?” Big life events can disrupt even the best strategies. Getting married, having a child or even becoming eligible for Social Security or Medicare will require that you make many financial decisions. A person may need to have more or less insurance, update their estate planning, switch investment philosophy, or save more or less for retirement.

8 Ways to Get a Loan For Your Small Business

Many entrepreneurs are finding that stricter underwriting guidelines make it nearly impossible to get a loan today. “The negative to a bank is that the loan can often be very hard or next to impossible to obtain,” says Rick Kahler, a certified financial planner with Kahler Financial Group in Rapid City, S.D. “Also, most bank loans are ‘recourse,’ meaning if there is a default, the bank can go after your personal assets as well as any collateral secured by the loan.” There is some great financial advice on eight ways you can get a small business loan in this excellent article by Karin Price Mueller for the Business Insider War Room

Hey Financial Planners, Do Your Job!

“Financial advisors, your job—our job—is to take the deep and wide and often perplexing discipline of personal finance and compress, streamline and simplify it for our clients.” This is the essential point of an article by financial planner and journalist Tim Maurer published February 2 at Forbes.com. Maurer challenges planners to “Do Your Job” more effectively. He includes a suggestion from Rick that planners need to pay more attention to listening to clients.

Is Lending to Your Child Worth the Risk?

Would you be willing to foreclose on your own child? It’s one of the important questions to answer before you even think about loaning money to your kids to buy a house. According to a February 16 article by Craig Guillot at nasdaq.com, “As more young people struggle to qualify for mortgages despite record-low mortgage rates and affordable home prices, some parents have decided to step in and become their child’s mortgage lender.” If done carefully, such a loan can be a source of income for the parents as well as a leg up for the kids. Guillot offers some excellent advice from Rick and several other sources on ways to prevent lending to your kids from becoming a financial and family disaster.

What to Do With Your Tax Refund

If you’re one of the early birds who already have their tax returns filed, chances are you’re expecting a refund. Routinely receiving a large refund isn’t a great idea, since you’re just getting back the interest-free loan you made to the government. If you’re expecting one this year, though, what should you do with it? Here’s Rick’s advice, as cited by Kristen Colella in a February 14 article at MainStreet.com: “I would recommend people strongly consider applying their tax refunds to any credit card debt, as most credit card interest is in excess of 10%, making reducing your debt a wise investment.”

What Do You Believe About Money?

“The first step of every financial plan must address what we believe about money, because what we believe about money will impact what we do for and with money.”

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Advisor Assets Under Management

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$150.0M
Total Assets
91
Clients
$1.6M
Estimated Average Account Balance Per Client
*An individual AUM and number of accounts has been entered by the advisor and has not been verified.

Firm Client Types

Individuals
High Net Worth Individuals
Charitable Organizations

*The Client Types data displayed is firm level data as reported on the SEC ADV filing.

Licenses and Conduct

Regulator
License Status
Registered
Disclosures

No Disclosures Found

As of Date
08/11/2014
*This advisor may not be SEC registered. The SEC maintains the database for state registered advisors as well as SEC registered advisors.
*A single dispute is often reported by both the SEC and FINRA and therefore will be reported as both an SEC dispute and FINRA dispute in this section.

Advisor Compensation Arrangements

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Fee Only
Advisor

This advisor has certified that they are compensated solely by their clients, and do not accept commissions or compensation of any kind based on the products they recommend.