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How do I find a seasoned Financial Advisor of exceptional talent in retirement portfolios?

It can be difficult to get a moment with many of you. What can I do to have a seasoned Financial Advisor of exceptional talent take a thorough look at an opportunity without having them feel as if I am attempting to convince them to leave where they are happy? Opportunities are supposed to be for the better, right? If you are happy, that's wonderful, but isn't happier desired or even a curiousity anymore? I don't understand the content. Please advise.

Daniel

May 03, 2012 by Daniel from Fort Washington, PA in  |  Flag
3 Answers  |  4 Followers
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2 votes

Daniel, you need to clearly communcate what you want to offer us.

1 Comment   |  Flag   |  May 03, 2012 from Cleveland, OH
Daniel

Thanks for responding Jeffrey. In this case, it's a position as a retirement sales advisor with a well-known multinational bank in Braintee, MA. I usually don't get to say that much let alone get into the details of the compensation. Advisors hear recruiter or headhunter and it's an automatic response, "Not interested". Sometimes with a,"click", right after it. What happened to knowing what you're saying no to? Saleman are opportunists in nature, no? How should I approach you?

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Flag |  May 03, 2012 near Fort Washington, PA

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Don Level 19

Daniel, advisors get lots of solicitations from investment companies, insurers, technology providers, consultants, etc. I've been in this business less than two years and am pretty astounded that I am already on the list of lots of vendors and recruiters alike. Imagine what that must be like for someone who has been doing this successfully for 10 years. Getting to "no" pretty fast is a survival strategy. I think this a group you want to try to target through your professional network. That way you get to know who the "exceptional advisors" are and they get to know you a little bit, or at least know someone who knows you. A cold call from someone hiring for a bank is unlikely to sound tempting to a successful advisor. Most advisors consider banks pretty far down the pecking order of attractive employers and won't give a cold caller enough time to explain what might be exceptional about the opportunity.

3 Comments   |  Flag   |  May 04, 2012 from Middlebury, VT
Daniel

Hello Donald, Thank you for responding! Your feedback helps a lot. I now understand the snap decision to say, “No”. You stated banks are, “pretty far down the pecking order”. Can you clarify why that is? Thanks again for your time. Daniel

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Flag |  May 07, 2012 near Fort Washington, PA
Don

I think top advisors will generally prefer either the independence of an RIA or the door-opening ability of the "name" brokers. Banks are generally thought to be pretty restrictive in terms of clientele and product offerings and aren't thought to be the top income generators. You'd need to overcome those biases to attract top talent.

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Flag |  May 07, 2012 near Middlebury, VT
Daniel

Donald, That really helps me understand more of your industry. I thank you sir. Just as an FYI, this bank provides leads. My understanding is that RIA's and "name" brokers do not experience that. If I am wrong, please advise. Otherwise, thank you again sir and to you Mr. Bogart. You both were very helpful. Any client would be honored by your service. May your business bloom like your helpfulness. Daniel

Flag |  May 07, 2012 near Fort Washington, PA

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Gary Ray Duell Level 18

If you're recruiting for partners, team members or actual employees then I recommend you master LinkedIn search and networking. Facebook groups can be useful too. But the best strategy is to be upfront and specific about your "opportunity" and why you think it is truly an opportunity.

Comment   |  Flag   |  May 04, 2016

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