Answers in 403b Plans

If you work for an educational institution, religious organization, or other tax-exempt organization, you likely have a 403b plan instead of a 401k plan. Here you can learn how 403b plans are unique and how to best utilize them in the context of your overall financial situation.
8 votes
Here is some useful info on the difference between 401(k) and 403(b) plans. 403(b) plans may be structured two different ways; 1) Non-ERISA voluntary plans, typically used by educators and have multiple providers available for their participants, usually ...(more)
1 vote
Generally…The same rules except for Catch Up Contributions $17,500 for 2013 and 2014; if age 50 or older, $23,000 (includes $5,500 maximum catch-up contribution) 15 Year Rule: The plan may also offer a catch-up contribution for employees with at least ...(more)
2 votes
You can make tax-deferred contributions into either a 401K or 403B...401K's are usually in the private sector and 403B in the public sector...the employer plan document details who are the approved provider's within your employer's plan...an asset allocation ...(more)
1 vote
Rich Winer Level 20
If you have a 403b plan, beware of financial advisors pushing fixed or indexed annuities (aka tax sheltered annuities or TSAs)! Too often, insurance agencies have cozy relationships with school systems and other 403b plan providers which gives them easy ...(more)
2 votes
Jason Hull Level 20
403bs also have different contribution limits depending on your age. You can check out the IRS guidelines for the contribution limits here: http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Plan-Participant,-Employee/Retirement-Topics---403(b)-Contribution-Limits
3 votes
Kevin J. McNab Level 19
Agree with the previous answer. A 403(b) works very much the same as a 401(k) from an investor's perspective. However, the fund expenses can be much higher for a 403(b). Hopefully, you have access to a provider such as TIAA-CREF with low cost option.
5 votes
My personal/professional opinion is that it is best to avoid borrowing from your retirement plan unless you have exhausted all other options. On the other hand a fellow professional whose views I have great respect for absolutly disagrees with me on ...(more)
0 votes
It depends on the carrier...403(b)'s are often annuity based. From a tax perspective, the contributions and rollover guidelines are the same.
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